How To Get Started Betting In Tennessee On Android

Posted on October 29, 2020

If you have an Android device and you’re keen to legally wager on sporting events in Tennessee, it will soon be quite easy to do so. Android sports betting apps will shortly become accessible in the Volunteer State.

Most Android device users are familiar with how to find apps and log into or register for accounts with them. Some may not be experienced with the nuances of that process for online sports betting, however.

It’s easy once you have the appropriate information.

Where to find Android sports betting apps for use in Tennessee

Unlike for many other products, you can’t find sports betting apps on Google Play. Google does not allow the listing of gambling apps on its marketplace. However, you can still find Android apps for sports betting if you know where to look.

The easiest way is to simply visit the sportsbook’s website using a mobile browser like Chrome or Firefox on your device. The mobile versions of these sites are completely functional, even though they sometimes lack aesthetics.

Once you are on the sportsbook’s website, it will provide you with a direct download link for the app, if there is one available.

Find out whether your sportsbook of choice is licensed in TN

If you’re uncertain as to whether the sportsbook you want to use is regulated in Tennessee, the authority on the subject is the Tennessee Education Lottery. It handles licensure and keeps an updated list of regulated operators on its website.

To date, the lottery has given approval to just four operators. There is no limit to how many licenses the lottery can award, however, so this list could grow quickly:

After you’ve located the sportsbook app for a licensed Tennessee operator, just download it onto your device. Your next mission, should you choose to accept it, is to either login or register.

How do I know whether I can just log in or if I need to register?

If you’ve ever played daily fantasy sports games online with DraftKings and/or FanDuel, you don’t need to register for a new account with either when the sportsbook opens up in Tennessee. In fact, it’s illegal to have more than one account with these companies.

Simply log in with your existing credentials. The app will still need to verify your eligibility to wager, which might require you to provide some additional information.

The same circumstances might apply if you’ve wagered with any of the operators online in other places.

This is where it can get a bit tricky, however. While some sportsbooks use one app across multiple jurisdictions, some maintain separate databases for each state.

While you won’t need to create a new account for DraftKings or FanDuel if you already have one, you will need to for BetMGM, as it maintains separate databases for each individual market it enters.

If you’re uncertain of whether you need to register for a new account, contact the customer support channels for the sportsbook. They are there to address these specific issues.

If you’re certain that you need to register an account, it’s easy and quick on the app. All you need is a few pieces of information about yourself.

Registering for a new account on an Android sports betting app

For the most part, the app will walk you right through the process. If you have any questions along the way, however, simply contact the book’s customer service department.

Some apps will give you the option to submit a photograph of your state ID to streamline the process. If you choose that option, you need to ensure that all the information on your ID is current.

Regardless of the method, sports betting apps will need the following information to verify your eligibility and identity for compliance with all legal standards:

  • Date of birth
  • Email address
  • Legal name
  • Mailing address
  • Last four digits of Social Security Number (for identification verification)

Once the app has verified you and your registration is complete, you’re ready to take the final necessary step to actually start wagering. This is when you hand over some of your hard-earned cash.

Funding your sports betting account on an Android app

Online sportsbooks make it relatively easy to fund your account. They accept many payment forms, including:

  • ACH payments from a checking or savings account
  • Credit/debit cards
  • Echecks
  • PayPal
  • Prepaid cards

If you want to pay with a credit or debit card, some apps will let you simply take a picture of the card. Along the same lines, if you want to use a checking or savings account and you have online banking, most apps will let you connect your accounts.

After the app has accepted your payment details, it’s time for you to decide how much you want to deposit initially. This is when it’s good to pause. Most sportsbooks offer their best promotional deals to first-time depositors.

Don’t make your first deposit without checking out bonuses

Once you register, you’re likely going to receive welcome emails and/or notifications from the sportsbook. Don’t discard them without checking them out.

Those messages will often contain details on promos tied to your first deposit. Although the details can vary from operator to operator and time to time, they generally fit within one of two categories:

  • Free bets
  • Matches

The first category is when the sportsbook promises to refund the value of your first wager(s) if you lose your bet, up to a certain value and based on how much you deposit.

Although there are limits, these guarantees can be worth up to hundreds of dollars.

The second classification is a bit simpler. The sportsbook just matches the value of your first deposit with site credit. Again, there is a limit to how much you can earn with these deals, but they can be lucrative.

At this point, you’re ready to inspect the markets and actually place your bets. Good luck, and hopefully, you will enjoy many years of fun wagering on your Android devices.

Photo by Associated Press
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Derek Helling

Derek Helling is a freelance journalist who resides in Chicago. He is a 2013 graduate of the University of Iowa and covers the intersections of sports with business and the law.

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